Conference: “Genesis of a New Human Being”; University of Bristol, 9-10 June 2017

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G E N E S I S  O F  A  N E W  H U M AN  B E I N G

A Conference About the Themes Approached in To Be Born
University of Bristol, 9 – 10 June 2017

9 June:

10:00 am: Welcome and registration

10:30 am: Katrina Mitcheson, University of West England: The Possibilities and Limits in Nietzsche’s Concepts of Pregnancy

11:15 am: Mahon O’Brien, University of Sussex: Nothing Against Natality

12:00: Andrea Wheeler, University of the State of Iowa: Rethinking Heidegger’s Fourfold and Luce Irigaray’s Philosophy in To Be Born

1:00 pm: Lunch

3:00 pm: Christos Hadjioannou, University College Dublin: Invaginating Dasein: Rythm, Breathing and Sexuate Constitution

3:45 pm: Jennifer Carter, Stony Brook University: How to lead a Child to Its Flowering (Further Steps)

Coffee Break

6:30 pm: Luce Irigaray, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique: How to Give Birth to a New Human Being

8:00 pm: Dinner

10 June:

10:00 am: Welcome and registration

10:30 am: Maria Fannin, University of Bristol: What a Child Can Teach Us: Reflections on Education in Luce Irigaray’s To Be Born

11:15 am: Elspeth Mitchell, University of Leeds: Gesture and Breath: Luce Irigaray’s To Be Born in the context of Film Studies and the audiovisual

12:00: Phyllis H. Kaminski, Saint Mary’s College Notre Dame: Faithful to Life

1:00 pm: Lunch

This announcement is still incomplete and the timetable provisory. Researchers who have participated in a past seminar of Luce Irigaray for PhD students can propose to give a talk during this conference.

Luce Irigaray on “To Be Born”, May 10th, 2017, ICA, London

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Luce Irigaray: Giving birth to oneself; giving birth to one another

The Institute of Contemporary Arts

10 May 2017 ; 6:30 pm | Cinema 1

Philosopher Luce Irigaray presents a talk reflecting upon the nature of human existence through an analysis of birth. This is introduced by Elspeth Mitchell, who also leads the following discussion and marks the publication of Irigaray’s latest book “To Be Born” (Palgrave MacMillan, 2017).

Professor Luce Irigaray is author of more than thirty books translated into various languages, the most recent of which are “Sharing the World” (2008), “In the Beginning, She Was” (2012) and “Through Vegetal Being” (co-authored with Michael Marder, 2016). She is also the co-editor (with Michael Marder) of “Building a New World” (2015), a volume in which early-career researchers from her seminars explore new ways of thinking, in order to promote a world-wide community respectful of differences between the sexes, generations, cultures and traditions.

Elspeth Mitchell is a PhD researcher at the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies, University of Leeds, exploring the figure of ‘the girl’ in the moving image and feminist philosophy. She is associate editor of the critical theory and philosophy journal parallax and recently co-convened the second Feminist Readings symposium in 2016. She is also co-director of SPUR, a contemporary arts collective based in the North of England.

Luce Irigaray will dedicate her book(s) after the presentation.

For more information visit: https://www.ica.art/whats-on/luce-irigaray-giving-birth-oneself-giving-birth-one-another

‘To Be Born: Genesis of a New Human Being’ Conference, Sussex, February 27

Department of Philosophy

University of Sussex

Sussex House, Falmer
Brighton, BN1 9RH
United Kingdom

Monday 27 February, from 10.00 a.m., Arts A108

In this event, world-renowned philosopher Luce Irigaray will speak about her new book To Be Born (Palgrave Macmillan 2017).

Speakers:

Katrina Mitcheson (University of the West of England): Giving Birth to the Overman

Andrea Wheeler (Iowa State University): What environment is suitable for supporting the development of the child?

Maria Fannin (University of Bristol): Giving Birth

Jennifer Carter (SUNY Stony Brook): TBC

Luce Irigaray: Giving Birth to Oneself, Giving Birth to One Another with responses by Mahon O’Brien, Tanja Staehler

About To Be Born:

In this book, Luce Irigaray – philosopher, linguist, psychologist and psychoanalyst – proposes nothing less than a new conception of being as well as a means to ensure its individual and relational development from birth.

Unveiling the mystery of our origin is probably what most motivates our quests and plans. Now such a disclosure proves to be impossible. Indeed we were born of a union between two, and we are forever deprived of an origin of our own. Hence our ceaseless search for roots: in our genealogy, in the place where we were born, in our culture, religion or language. But a human being cannot develop starting from roots as a tree does, it must take on responsibility for its own being and existence without continuity with its origin and background.

How can we succeed in doing that? First by cultivating our breathing, which is not only the means thanks to which we come into the world, but which also allows us to transcend mere survival towards a spiritual becoming. Taking on our sexuate belonging is the second element which makes us able to assume our natural existence. Indeed this determination at once brings us energy and provides us with a structure which contributes to our individuation and our relations with other living beings and the world. Our sexuation can also compensate for our absence of roots by compelling us to unite with the other sex so that we freely approach the copulative conjunction from which we were born; that is, the mystery of our origin. This does not occur through a mere sexual instinct or drive, but requires us to cultivate desire and love with respect for our mutual difference(s). In this way we become able to give rise to a new human being, not only at a natural but also at an ontological level.

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To Be Born: Birth, Existence and Responsibility, 25th February 2017, London

To Be Born: Birth, Existence and Responsibility

Saturday 25 February 2017

11:00AM to 12:30PM

Wolfson Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE, London, WC2A 3LJ

Hosted by the Forum for European Philosophy and LSE Literary Festival

In this event, world-renowned philosopher Luce Irigaray will speak about her new book To Be Born (Palgrave Macmillan 2017).

In this book, Luce Irigaray – philosopher, linguist, psychologist and psychoanalyst – proposes nothing less than a new conception of being as well as a means to ensure its individual and relational development from birth.

Unveiling the mystery of our origin is probably what most motivates our quests and plans. Now such a disclosure proves to be impossible. Indeed we were born of a union between two, and we are forever deprived of an origin of our own. Hence our ceaseless search for roots: in our genealogy, in the place where we were born, in our culture, religion or language. But a human being cannot develop starting from roots as a tree does, it must take on responsibility for its own being and existence without continuity with its origin and background.

How can we succeed in doing that? First by cultivating our breathing, which is not only the means thanks to which we come into the world, but which also allows us to transcend mere survival towards a spiritual becoming. Taking on our sexuate belonging is the second element which makes us able to assume our natural existence. Indeed this determination at once brings us energy and provides us with a structure which contributes to our individuation and our relations with other living beings and the world. Our sexuation can also compensate for our absence of roots by compelling us to unite with the other sex so that we freely approach the copulative conjunction from which we were born; that is, the mystery of our origin. This does not occur through a mere sexual instinct or drive, but requires us to cultivate desire and love with respect for our mutual difference(s). In this way we become able to give rise to a new human being, not only at a natural but also at an ontological level.

Speakers
Luce Irigaray, Director of Research in Philosophy, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France
Mahon O’Brien, Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Sussex
Tanja Staehler, Reader in Philosopher, University of Sussex

Chair
Danielle Sands, Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture, Royal Holloway, University of London, and Forum for European Philosophy

More info: here

“Through Vegetal Being” – the ICA Book of the Year 2016!

We are pleased to announce the winner of the ICA Book of the Year 2016 is Through Vegetal Being: Two Philosophical Perspectives, by Luce Irigaray and Michael Marder (Columbia Univerity Press 2016). It is a personal, philosophical, and political meditation on the significance of the vegetal for our lives, our ways of thinking, and our relations with human and nonhuman beings.

 

Luce Irigaray talking on Nietzsche at Kingston University, 25th November 2016

Conference

NIETZSCHE, PSYCHOANALYSIS, AND FEMINISM

Kingston University London

Penrhyn Road campus, John Galsworthy building, Room 0002

November 25-November 26, 2016

 

10:30-12:30

PLENARY SPEAKER

LUCE IRIGARAY: ‘Why Freudian Psychoanalysis Could Not Rescue Nietzsche’

Response by Willow Verkerk, Kingston University

Please click here to view the programme.

For further information about this event click here or contact:

Willow Verkerk
Email: W.Verkerk@kingston.ac.uk